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HGTV

Challenge

The initial challenge presented by the client was to create the comfortable feeling of a neighborhood bar with an underlying timeless and classicly rich feel of a supper club.  Couple this with the established brand of the family name (quality in food, drink and service). Not only did this have to be true to the current establishment directly across the street, but also to the name sake, their grandfather’s downtown 1950’s Little Club.  The original club is recognized in the wall mural as well as noted in details such as the mirror panels of the back bar - a material used in the original club, along with the the use of a vintage tile size at the bar and restrooms.



 

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Approach

Candice introduced several space-saving and innovative solutions to help visually maximize the space, call attention to native design features, and introduce new elements that would update the home for the 21st century. Flooring was installed at an angled pattern to visually widen the narrow living room. Salvaged wood and smooth concrete created crisp, new lines. Closed and open cabinetry introduced contrast. Pops of color integrated with the client’s own art and the space’s new color palette. In all of these details (and many more), the space took on a new look that marries art deco and midcentury modern aesthetics.

Candice worked alongside a number of key collaborators to help see the project through, including: concrete by Solid716, cabinets by Wrafterbuilt, lighting by Emerson James, select furniture from room, construction services by FTH Enterprises, flowers by Arrigo’s Flower Shop, and photography by Cody Osborne.

 

Results

The success of the project was by marrying the timeless elements of high end materials, ie leathers, wood, shiny metals, stone with the materials found in a city street scape – rough dark metals, concrete, colorful street art.  Playful curves in mirrored panels are used to not only enhance the backbar scape but to reflect light back into the smaller footprint and expand the visual prose. And a nod to the wine itself is found in the overall color palette.